Bag Check: What to bring to a Tennis match in your Tennis Bag

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Day Six of the 2015 US Open at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on September 5, 2015 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City.

I’ve been reading  Winning Ugly: Mental Warfare in Tennis by Brad Gilbert. This part stuck out to me.

The player who understands the significance of gaining a small advantage (and of doing so repeatedly) might still underestimate the role that tennis equipment can play in helping you win more matches. Yes, you can bring the bare minimum, but any player who is serious about winning will go beyond the bare minimum.

I decided to make a quick list for my old high school team. I did some extra research and found this explanation from Gonzo Tennis very satisfying. Answering the question. Why even care?

If you’re heading over to the public courts for a quick rally or match with a buddy then don’t worry about what you bring with you (apart from a racquet and shoes) as there is no consequence for quitting early due to equipment malfunction or injury. However, if you are going into battle, so to speak, where winning might actually matter to you, you should have your tennis bag packed with these just-in-case items. Obviously, preparing for every eventuality is impossible so don’t bother trying. Keep the following basics in your bag and you can feel comfortable that you have taken reasonable measures.

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10 Essential items

  1. Water, drink plenty before, during and after your match. Hydration is the key to good performance. Sip water on every changeover.
  1. Energy food: bananas, oranges, mangos, apples, cliff bars, granola bars
  1. Rackets, at least 2 rackets, in case you break a string
  1. Towels, 1-2 regular size towels to keep you dry
  1. Medical kit: Different types of bandages, neosporin, athletic tape, blister specific bandages, body powder, small pair of scissors, sunscreen, lip balm
  1. Dry tennis clothes: 1-2 spare TC tennis shirts, 2-3 pairs of dry socks, extra shoelaces, extra pair of tennis shoes, sweatbands
  1. Hat with a visor and sunglasses
  1. Over grips, in case yours get soaked or unravel
  1. Extra Shock absorber, in case yours flys off and you can’t find it
  1. A plastic shopping bag, for wet clothes, or for a makeshift cold pack

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Credit: Winning Ugly: Mental Warfare in Tennis by Brad Gilbert

How I paid for my vacation to San Miguel de Tucuman, Argentina

Studying abroad in Tucuman, Argentina was a turning point in my life. Now at 23 I want to return to see friends I made when I was 16. When I got my job in the Oil Field I made sure that my first vacation would be back to Red Clay Courts of Tucuman.

I come from a middle class family who believed in hard work and the promise of education. Through college I worked odd jobs and saved money.

In sophomore year I listened to a podcast from Ramit Sethi, and promptly bought his book, I Will Teach You to Be Rich. A crazy title I know, but that ostentatiously titled book laid out the basics of money management.

All together the 18 day trip cost me $2400. When I got back my bank account wasn’t empty and there was no money hangover in the form of payments to credit card companies. This journey taught me how to save and be frugal; habits that will stick with me for the rest of my life.

Argentine Asado.
Argentine Asado.

1) The biggest strategy was Automatic bank withdrawal into a high yield online savings account with Capital One 360. $50 to $150 withdrawn without me having to move a muscle. Slowly building up money for 24 months, this was how I bought my ticket straight up.

Open an account now
2) Bring stuff to sell there. This was something I researched before going down. In Argentina Iphones are highly prized due to import restrictions and high tariffs. Labtops, ipads, and anything Mac related will sell for high prices. I took down skateboards to sell to my friends for a steep discount and in exchange for staying at his place.

The Country where an Iphone cost $3,500
3) Learn how to cook. I began with Mexican food. Its a lot of cleanup so I wouldn’t recommend it for beginners. I would recommend grilling a whole chicken.

 

4) Got on Mint and started tracking all my spending. I used to spend irrationally at the grocery store. I used to have a full refrigerator. Now I buy for 1 week, and use up everything. I have cans of soup for when food gets low, but I enjoy being creative with meals.
5) Buy a bike. I use it all the time being close to the grocery store, and gym. I save money on gas and repairs for my car.
6) Follow Personal Finance Bloggers. Ramit Sethi helped me negotiate my rent down 15% using his scripts in my emails. I ended up saving $800 from 1 email.
7) Take care of the stuff I own, I like to keep the stuff I have equal. If I buy something like a new shirt I have to either give a dress shirt away or throw it out. I clean the shoes I own and now they last 50% longer than before. Learn how to wash certain things. Jeans don’t need to be washed that much, and when you do, make sure to flip them out. When my phone screen cracked, I learned how to repair it online and bought a kit to do it. Now I have repaired it twice.

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8) Bring cash. The official rate is 9 pesos. Dollar Blue is 13 pesos. Bring $100 bills only. Go to where the banks are and people outside will trade with you. Listen to the word, “Cambio”. It means change in Spanish.

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9) Get a Skymiles credit card. Got into the lounge area for $30. I had food, drinks, Wifi, and a shower. Yeah it was worth $30 to pass 5 hours in the Atlanta airport. If I could do it over again I would have opened up the card 2 years ago. You can ask for a limit increase every 6 months. Right now my limit is only $1000. And tickets to Argentina are between 1,300-2,000 roundtrip. This is to save up miles for my next trip to Tucuman.